F5 BIG-IP SSL Orchestrator Training Lab > Class 2: SSL Orchestration v5 (Ravello) > Module 1 - Create a Transparent Forward Proxy SSLO Source | Edit on
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Lab 1.6: Services List

The Services List page is used to define security services that attach to SSLO. The 5.0 SSLO Guided Configuration now includes a services catalog that contains common product integrations. Beneath each of these catalog options is one of the five basic service types. The service catalog also provides “generic” security services. Depending on screen resolution, it may be necessary to scroll down to see additional services.

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This lab will create one of each type of security service.

  • To begin adding services, click Add Service

  • Inline layer 2 service - select the FireEye Inline Layer 2 service from the catalog and click Add, or simply double-click it.

    • Name - provide a unique name to this service (example “FireEye”).
    • Network Configuration - paths define the network interfaces that take inspectable traffic to the inline service and receive traffic from the service. Click Add.
      • Ratio - inline security services are natively load balanced, so this setting defines a ratio, if any for the load balanced pool members. Enter 1.
      • From BIGIP VLAN - this is the interface taking traffic to the inline service. Select the Create New option, enter a unique name (ex. FireEye_in), select the F5 interface connecting to the inbound side of the service, and add a VLAN tag value if required. For this lab, select interface 1.6 without a tag.
      • To BIGIP VLAN - this is the interface receiving traffic from the inline service. Select the Create New option, enter a unique name (ex. FireEye_out), select the F5 interface connecting to the outbound side of the service, and add a VLAN tag value if required. For this lab, select interface 1.7 without a tag.
      • Click Done.
    • Service Action Down - SSLO also natively monitors the load balanced pool of security devices, and if all pool members fail, can actively bypass this service (Ignore), or stop all traffic (Reset, Drop). For this lab, leave it set to Ignore.
    • Enable Port Remap - this setting allows SSLO to remap the port of HTTPS traffic flowing across this service. This is advantageous when a security service defines port 443 traffic as encrypted HTTPS and natively ignores it. By remapping HTTPS traffic to, say, port 8080, the security service will inspect the traffic. For this lab, enable (check) this option and enter a port value value (ex. 8080).
    • iRules - SSLO now allows for the insertion of additional iRule logic at different points. An iRule defined at the service only affects traffic flowing across this service. It is important to understand, however, that these iRules must not be used to control traffic flow (ex. pools, nodes, virtuals, etc.), but rather should be used to view/modify application layer protocol traffic. For example, an iRule assigned here could be used to view and modify HTTP traffic flowing to/from the service. Additional iRules are not required, however, so leave this empty.
    • Click Save and then Add Service.
  • Inline layer 3 service - select the Generic Inline Layer 3 service from the catalog and click Add, or simply double-click it.

    • Name - provide a unique name to this service (example “IPS”).

    • IP Family - this setting defines the IP family used with this layer 3 service. Leave it set to IPv4.

    • Auto Manage Addresses - when enabled the Auto Manage Addresses setting provides a set of unique, non-overlapping, non-routable IP addresses to be used by the security service. If disabled, the To and From IP addresses must be configured manually. It is recommended to leave this option enabled (checked).

      Note

      In environments where SSLO is introduced to existing security devices, it is a natural tendency to not want to have to move these devices. And while SSLO certainly allows it, by not moving the security devices into SSLO-protected enclaves, customers run the risk of exposing sensitive decrypted traffic, unintentionally, to other devices that may be connected to these existing networks. It is therefore highly recommended, and a security best practice, to remove SSLO-integrated security devices from existing networks and place them entirely within the isolated enclave created and maintained by SSLO.

    • To Service Configuration - the “To Service” defines the network connectivity from SSLO to the inline security device.

      • To Service - with the Auto Manage Addresses option enabled, this IP address will be pre-defined, therefore the inbound side of the service must match this IP subnet. With the Auto Manage Addresses option disabled, the IP address must be defined manually. For this lab, leave the 198.19.64.7/25 address intact.
      • VLAN - select the Create New option, provide a unique name (ex. IPS_in), select the F5 interface connecting to the inbound side of the service, and add a VLAN tag value if required. For this lab, select interface 1.3 and VLAN tag 50.
    • Service Down Action - SSLO also natively monitors the load balanced pool of security devices, and if all pool members fail, can actively bypass this service (Ignore), or stop all traffic (Reset, Drop). For this lab, leave it set to Ignore.

    • L3 Devices - this defines the inbound-side IP address of the inline layer 3 service, used for routing traffic to this device. Multiple load balanced IP addresses can be defined here. Click Add, enter 198.19.64.64, then click Done.

    • From Service Configuration - the “From Service” defines the network connectivity from the inline security device to SSLO.

      • From Service - with the Auto Manage Addresses option enabled, this IP address will be pre-defined, therefore the outbound side of the service must match this IP subnet. With the Auto Manage Addresses option disabled, the IP address must be defined manually. For this lab, leave the 198.19.64.245/25 address intact.
      • VLAN - select the Create New option, provide a unique name (ex. IPS_out), select the F5 interface connecting to the outbound side of the service, and add a VLAN tag value if required. For this lab, select interface 1.3 and VLAN tag 60.
    • Enable Port Remap - this setting allows SSLO to remap the port of HTTPS traffic flowing across this service. This is advantageous when a security service defines port 443 traffic as encrypted HTTPS and natively ignores it. By remapping HTTPS traffic to, say, port 8181, the security service will inspect the traffic. For this lab, enable (check) this option and enter a port value value (ex. 8181).

    • Manage SNAT Settings - SSLO now defines an option to enable SNAT (source NAT) across an inline layer 3/HTTP service. The primary use case for this is horizontal SSLO scaling, where independent SSLO devices are scaled behind a separate load balancer but share the same inline layer 3/HTTP services. As these devices must route back to SSLO, there are now multiple SSLO devices to route back to. SNAT allows the layer 3/HTTP device to know which SSLO sent the packets for proper routing. SSLO scaling also requires that the Auto Manage option be disabled, to provide separate address spaces on each SSLO. For this, leave it set to None.

    • iRules - SSLO now allows for the insertion of additional iRule logic at different points. An iRule defined at the service only affects traffic flowing across this service. It is important to understand, however, that these iRules must not be used to control traffic flow (ex. pools, nodes, virtuals, etc.), but rather should be used to view/modify application layer protocol traffic. For example, an iRule assigned here could be used to view and modify HTTP traffic flowing to/from the service. Additional iRules are not required, however, so leave this empty.

    • Click Save and then Add Service.

  • Inline HTTP service - an inline HTTP service is defined as an explicit or transparent proxy for HTTP (web) traffic. Select the WSA HTTP Proxy service from the catalog and click Add, or simply double-click it.

    • Name - provide a unique name to this service (example “Proxy”).

    • IP Family - this setting defines the IP family used with this layer 3 service. Leave it set to IPv4.

    • Auto Manage Addresses - when enabled the Auto Manage Addresses setting provides a set of unique, non-overlapping, non-routable IP addresses to be used by the security service. If disabled, the To and From IP addresses must be configured manually. It is recommended to leave this option enabled (checked).

      Note

      In environments where SSLO is introduced to existing security devices, it is a natural tendency to not want to have to move these devices. And while SSLO certainly allows it, by not moving the security devices into SSLO-protected enclaves, customers run the risk of exposing sensitive decrypted traffic, unintentionally, to other devices that may be connected to these existing networks. It is therefore highly recommended, and a security best practice, to remove SSLO-integrated security devices from existing networks and place them entirely within the isolated enclave created and maintained by SSLO.

    • Proxy Type - this defines the proxy mode that the inline HTTP service is in. For this lab, set this option to Explicit.

    • To Service Configuration - the “To Service” defines the network connectivity from SSLO to the inline security device.

      • To Service - with the Auto Manage Addresses option enabled, this IP address will be pre-defined, therefore the inbound side of the service must match this IP subnet. With the Auto Manage Addresses option disabled, the IP address must be defined manually. For this lab, leave the 198.19.96.7/25 address intact.
      • VLAN - select the Create New option, provide a unique name (ex. Proxy_in), select the F5 interface connecting to the inbound side of the service, and add a VLAN tag value if required. For this lab, select interface 1.3 and VLAN tag 110.
    • Service Down Action - SSLO also natively monitors the load balanced pool of security devices, and if all pool members fail, can actively bypass this service (Ignore), or stop all traffic (Reset, Drop). For this lab, leave it set to Ignore.

    • HTTP Proxy Devices - this defines the inbound-side IP address of the inline HTTP service, used for passing traffic to this device. Multiple load balanced IP addresses can be defined here. For a transparent proxy HTTP service, only an IP address is required. For an explicit proxy HTTP service, the IP address and listening port is required. Click Add, enter 198.19.96.66 for the IP Address, and 3128 for the Port, then click Done.

    • From Service Configuration - the “From Service” defines the network connectivity from the inline security device to SSLO.

      • From Service - with the Auto Manage Addresses option enabled, this IP address will be pre-defined, therefore the outbound side of the service must match this IP subnet. With the Auto Manage Addresses option disabled, the IP address must be defined manually. For this lab, leave the 198.19.96.245/25 address intact.
      • VLAN - select the Create New option, provide a unique name (ex. Proxy_out), select the F5 interface connecting to the outbound side of the service, and add a VLAN tag value if required. For this lab, select interface 1.3 and VLAN tag 120.
    • Manage SNAT Settings - SSLO now defines an option to enable SNAT (source NAT) across an inline layer 3/HTTP service. The primary use case for this is horizontal SSLO scaling, where independent SSLO devices are scaled behind a separate load balancer but share the same inline layer 3/HTTP services. As these devices must route back to SSLO, there are now multiple SSLO devices to route back to. SNAT allows the layer 3/HTTP device to know which SSLO sent the packets for proper routing. SSLO scaling also requires that the Auto Manage option be disabled, to provide separate address spaces on each SSLO. For this, leave it set to None.

    • Authentication Offload - when an Access authentication profile is attached to an explicit forward proxy topology, this option will present the authenticated username value to the service as an X-Authenticated-User HTTP header. For this lab, leave it disabled (unchecked).

    • iRules - SSLO now allows for the insertion of additional iRule logic at different points. An iRule defined at the service only affects traffic flowing across this service. It is important to understand, however, that these iRules must not be used to control traffic flow (ex. pools, nodes, virtuals, etc.), but rather should be used to view/modify application layer protocol traffic. For example, an iRule assigned here could be used to view and modify HTTP traffic flowing to/from the service. Additional iRules are not required, however, so leave this empty.

    • Click Save and then Add Service.

  • ICAP service - an ICAP service is an RFC 3507-defined service that provides some set of services over the ICAP protocol. Select the Digital Guardian ICAP service from the catalog and click Add, or simply double-click it.

    • Name - provide a unique name to this service (example “DLP”).
    • IP Family - this setting defines the IP family used with this layer 3 service. Leave it set to IPv4.
    • ICAP Devices - this defines the IP address of the ICAP service, used for passing traffic to this device. Multiple load balanced IP addresses can be defined here. Click Add, enter 10.70.0.10 for the IP Address, and 1344 for the Port, and then click Done.
    • ICAP Headers - select either Default or Custom to specify additional ICAP headers. To add custom headers, select Custom, otherwise leave as Default.
    • OneConnect - the F5 OneConnect profile improves performance by reusing TCP connections to ICAP servers to process multiple transactions. If the ICAP servers do not support multiple ICAP transactions per TCP connection, do not enable this option. For this lab, leave the OneConnect setting enabled (checked).
    • Request URI Path - this is the RFC 3507-defined URI request path to the ICAP service. Each ICAP security vendor will differ with respect to request and response URIs, and preview length, so it is important to review the vendor’s documentation. In this lab, enter /squidclamav.
    • Response URI Path - this is the RFC 3507-defined URI response path to the ICAP service. Each ICAP security vendor will differ with respect to request and response URIs, and preview length, so it is important to review the vendor’s documentation. In this lab, enter /squidclamav.
    • Preview Max Length(bytes) - this defines the maximum length of the ICAP preview. Each ICAP security vendor will differ with respect to request and response URIs, and preview length, so it is important to review the vendor’s documentation. A zero-length preview length implies that data will be streamed to the ICAP service, similar to an HTTP 100/Expect process, while any positive integer preview length defines the amount of data (in bytes) that are transmitted first, before streaming the remaining content. The ICAP service in this lab environment does not support a complete stream, so requires a modest amount of initial preview. In this lab, enter 524288.
    • Service Down Action - SSLO also natively monitors the load balanced pool of security devices, and if all pool members fail, can actively bypass this service (Ignore), or stop all traffic (Reset, Drop). For this lab, leave it set to Ignore.
    • HTTP Version - this defines whether SSLO sends HTTP/1.1 or HTTP/1.0 requests to the ICAP service. The lab’s ICAP service supports both.
    • ICAP Policy - an ICAP policy is a pre-defined LTM CPM policy that can be configured to control access to the ICAP service based on attributes of the HTTP request or response. ICAP processing is enabled by default, so an ICAP CPM policy can be used to disable the request and/or response ADAPT profiles. Leave this blank (–Select–)
    • Click Save and then Add Service.
  • TAP service - a TAP service is a passive device that simply receives a copy of traffic. Select the Cisco Sourcefire TAP service from the catalog and click Add, or simply double-click it.

    • Name - provide a unique name to this service (example “TAP”).
    • Mac Address - for a tap service that is not directly connected to the F5, enter the device’s MAC address. For a tap service that is directly connected to the F5, the MAC address does not matter and can be arbitrarily defined. For this lab, enter 12:12:12:12:12:12.
    • VLAN - this defines the interface connecting the F5 to the TAP service. Click Create New and provide a unique name (ex. TAP_in).
    • Interface - select the 1.4 interface without a tag.
    • Enable Port Remap - this setting allows SSLO to remap the port of HTTPS traffic flowing to this service. For this lab, leave the option disabled (unchecked).
    • Click Save.
  • Click Save & Next.