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tmsh(1)                                                                BIG-IP TMSH Manual                                                                tmsh(1)



NAME
       tmsh - Traffic Management Shell - A command line interface for managing
       the BIG-IP(r) system.

DESCRIPTION
       You can use tmsh to configure and manage the BIG-IP system in
       conjunction with the Configuration utility, which is the browser-based
       BIG-IP system and network management tool.

MODULES
       The structure of tmsh is hierarchical and modular. The highest level is
       the root module, which contains subordinate modules: auth, cli, gtm,
       ltm, net, sys and wom. Use the command help with no arguments to
       display the module hierarchy relative to the current module.

       The gtm, ltm, net, sys, and wom modules also contain subordinate
       modules. All modules and subordinate modules contain components. To
       display the list of modules and components that are available in the
       current module type Tab or ? at the tmsh prompt.

       Commands operate on components. To display the list of available
       commands type Tab or ? at the beginning of the command line. To display
       a list of components on which a command can operate type the command
       followed by a space followed by Tab or ?.

       The following examples illustrate how to navigate the tmsh hierarchy.

       To enter a module, type the name of the module at the tmsh prompt.

        (tmos)# ltm

       The prompt displays the current module location.

        (tmos.ltm)#

       You can display the components in a module using the commands list
       (configuration) and show (statistics and runtime status). The following
       command sequence displays the virtual server configuration of the BIG-
       IP system.

        (tmos.ltm)# list virtual

       In the following examples, the commands list and show display
       information about only ltm components.

        (tmos.ltm)# list
        (tmos.ltm)# show

       You can access any component in any module from any other module by
       specifying a complete path to the component. For example, from the ltm
       module, the following command displays all of the properties of the
       VLANs on the system. The forward slash / specifies that what follows is
       relative to the root module.

        (tmos.ltm)# list /net vlan all-properties

       The forward slash is optional if the root module is the current module.
       For example, the following command sequences display profiles.

        (tmos)# list ltm profile
        (tmos)# list /ltm profile
        (tmos)# list / ltm profile

       Most components also support component mode. You can navigate to a
       single component and run commands to manage that component. For
       example, from the ltm module, to navigate to the node component, use
       the following command.

        (tmos.ltm)# node

       To display the properties of all nodes, use the following command.

        (tmos.ltm.node)# list

       You can also navigate to a specific object (object mode). For example,
       from the node component, to enter object mode for a specific node,
       enter the command modify followed by the IP address of the node.

        (tmos.ltm.node)# modify 10.1.1.10

       In object mode, you can configure property settings directly. For
       example, to set the connection limit for 10.1.1.10 to 10000, use the
       following command.

        (tmos.ltm.node.10.1.1.10)# connection-limit 10000

       To exit a module enter the command exit at the tmsh prompt, as shown
       below.

        (tmos.ltm)# exit
        (tmos)#

PRODUCT PROVISIONING
       You must provision a BIG-IP system module before you can use tmsh to
       configure that product, for example, the Global Traffic Manager. The
       command sequence list sys provision displays the BIG-IP system modules
       that can be provisioned. For more information about provisioning, see
       the TMOS(r) Management Guide for BIG-IP Systems and help sys provision.

LOADING/SAVING THE SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
       The system applies all configuration changes that you make from within
       tmsh to the running configuration of the system.

       You can save a portion of the running configuration known as the base
       configuration. You can also load the base configuration from the stored
       configuration files.

       To save the base configuration to the stored configuration files, use
       the command sequence: save sys base-config.
       To replace the running base configuration with the configuration in the
       stored configuration files, use the command sequence: load /sys base-
       config.

       Additionally, you can save the entire running configuration or load all
       of the stored configuration files.

       To save the entire running configuration to the stored configuration
       files, use the command sequence: save /sys config.
       To replace the entire running configuration with the configuration in
       the stored configuration files using the command sequence: load /sys
       config.

HELP
       tmsh tmsh includes man pages for each of the commands and components
       that are available within tmsh. You access the man pages using the
       following command syntax: help [ [command]  | [full path to component]
       ].

       For example, to access the man page for the vlan component from the
       root module, use this command sequence: help / net vlan.

       You can also search the man pages for information on a specific topic.
       To do this you use the command syntax: help search [topic]. You can
       perform a help search from within any module in the tmsh hierarchy. For
       example, to find the man pages that contain a reference to VLANs, use
       this command sequence: help search vlan

       To display a list of topics that are available in a module use this
       command sequence: help [full path to module].

       For example, to display the topics that are available in the current
       module use this command: help. To display the topics that are available
       in the net module use this command sequence: help / net.

CONTEXT-SENSITIVE HELP
       tmsh includes a context-sensitive help feature that provides help as
       you type commands. At any time, you can type a question mark (?) on the
       command line, and tmsh returns information to assist you in completing
       the command. Based on when you type the question mark, you get the
       following results.

       When you type a question mark immediately following any portion of a
       command, tmsh returns possible completions for the command, but does
       not complete the command as the command completion feature does.
       When you type a space before the question mark, tmsh returns
       descriptive text that explains the commands, components, or properties
       that you can configure.
       When you type a question mark in the middle of a command, tmsh returns
       help on the command to the left of the cursor.

       Note: To use a question mark in a Glob or regular expression, you must
       escape the question mark using quotation marks, apostrophes, or a
       backslash.

       Additionally, you can request context-sensitive help for the last
       command in a series of commands. For more information, see ENTERING
       MULTIPLE COMMANDS, following.

COMMAND COMPLETION
       At any point while typing or editing a command in tmsh, you can press
       the Tab key. tmsh either completes the current or next word, or
       displays possible completions for the current or next word. If tmsh
       displays nothing after you press the Tab key, no options exist to
       complete the word. If you move the cursor anywhere on the command line
       and press the Tab key, tmsh completes what is to the left of the
       cursor.

       Command completion also reduces the amount of typing that is required
       to run commands. When you press the Tab key, the system automatically
       completes the current command-line element to as many unique characters
       as possible. If there is more than one possible completion the list of
       possible completions displays. Command completion also completes
       configuration object identifiers.

ENTERING MULTIPLE COMMANDS
       You can enter multiple commands on the command line by separating the
       commands with semi-colons (;). For example, to display the properties
       of the self IP addresses and VLANs of the system, use this command
       sequence:

        list / net self ; list / net vlan

       When you enter multiple commands in this way, all of the commands are
       added to the command history in a single line item, regardless of
       whether any of the commands were successful. However, if one of the
       commands that you enter fails to parse, tmsh does not run the remaining
       commands you entered. tmsh audits commands as the commands run;
       therefore, if a command fails to parse, tmsh does not audit the
       remaining commands. For more information about the command history, see
       COMMAND HISTORY, following.

       You can also specify multiple commands in a command alias by separating
       the commands with semi-colons. For example, to create an alias that
       displays the properties of the VLANs and VLAN groups on the system, use
       this command sequence:

        create / cli alias vlans command "list / net vlan ; list / net vlan-group"

       You can request context-sensitive help and utilize the command
       completion feature on the last command in a series of commands. For
       example, the following command sequence displays help for the vlan-
       group component.

        list / net vlan ; list / net vlan-group ?

COMMAND HISTORY
       tmsh saves in the command history file each command that you enter. The
       command history persists when you log off of the system. The next time
       you log on to the system, you can search for, display, and then edit,
       the tmsh commands that you entered in previous sessions. The command
       history persists even through a restart of the BIG-IP system. For more
       information about the command history feature, see help history.

       The following examples show how to use the command history feature.

       To display the commands in the history list, enter either the command
       sequence show history or an exclamation point (!). tmsh displays a list
       of commands each preceded by a numeric ID.

       To run a command from the history list, enter an exclamation point
       followed by the numeric ID of the command.

       To run the previous command, enter !!.

FILTERING OUTPUT
       You can filter the output generated by the commands list (configuration
       settings) and show (statistics and runtime status) using the UNIX grep
       utility. You must type the character | before the grep specification.
       You can use multiple filters chained together. For a list of supported
       grep options, see the Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) Reference Guide.

       The following examples show how to use the grep utility in tmsh.

        list ltm node | grep "^10\.2"
        list ltm virtual | grep -i seattle
        list ltm virtual | grep -i abc | grep -i ab | grep -i a

KEYBOARD BINDINGS
       tmsh supports vi, emacs and default keyboard bindings. You can set the
       binding using the keymap preference. For more information, see help cli
       preference. For a detailed description of the default mapping, see the
       Traffic Management Shell (tmsh) Reference Guide.

       Note that all mappings provide command-line editing and the capability
       to search the command history.

WILDCARD OBJECT IDENTIFIERS
       You can specify configuration object identifiers using glob and regular
       expression syntax.

       For glob and regular expression syntax rules, see help glob and help
       regex. Note that you can escape the glob and regular expression special
       characters using a back slash.

       The following examples show how to use glob and regular expressions in
       tmsh.

       Uses a glob expression to display the configuration of all nodes that
       begin with 10.1..

        list ltm node 10.1.*

       Uses a regular expression to display the configuration of all nodes
       that begin with 10. and contain .44.. Note that a regular expression
       must begin with an @ symbol. This identifies to tmsh that the
       identifier should be treated as a regular expression and not a glob or
       standard object identifier. The leading @ is not part of the regular
       expression.

        list ltm node @^10\..*\.44\.

PREFERENCES
       You can customize the behavior of tmsh. For more information, see help
       cli preference.

FILES
       tmsh manages several files in a user's home directory.

       $HOME/.tmsh-history- contains command history.

STATISTICS
       You can use tmsh to display statistics, including historical
       performance statistics. You can select the format in which the
       statistics display, as well as reset the statistics for some of the
       tmsh components. To determine if statistics are available for a
       component, see the man page for the specific component.

       The following examples show how to display and reset statistics for the
       net interface component from the root module.

        show net interface
        reset-stats net interface

       The following examples show how to display and reset statistics for the
       net interface component from the net module.

        show interface
        reset-stats interface

AUTOMATING TMSH
       You can use tmsh to build TCL scripts to automate management of the
       BIG-IP. See the cli script help page.

COMMAND LINE OPTIONS
       The following options can be specified when tmsh is started from the
       system shell.

       -a   tmsh does not write commands to the command history file.

            Note that if auditing is enabled, tmsh continues to write commands
            to the audit log. This option is useful when writing scripts from
            the system shell, because it stops the scripts from filling up the
            command history file. This option applies to the non-interactive
            mode only.

       -c   Run the specified command. A command that contains multiple
            arguments must be in quotes. No other options may be specified
            after -c

       -d [ip address | host name]
            Connects to the specified blade in a clustered system.

       -e   Disables video highlighting in tmsh.

       -h   Displays options you can use when accessing tmsh from the system
            shell.

       -m   Generates a tmsh debug log named tmsh.out in the current
            directory.

            Note that when you run a tmsh script, the shell generates a debug
            log file for the script named tmsh.out.[script name].

            Using this option causes tmsh to run significantly slower.

       -q   Prevents tmsh from responding to user actions with questions. This
            option is useful when writing non-interactive shell scripts from
            the system shell.

       -r 
            This option allows the user to run TMSH the specified version.
            This is used to provide backwards compatibility for older TMSH
            syntax only. The version must be specified in the format
            maj.min.pt, for example 11.5.0

SEE ALSO
       Detailed information on the following topics is available through the
       help command: cli preference, cli script, glob, help, regex, and sys
       provision.

       For complete information about tmsh, see the Traffic Management Shell
       (tmsh) Reference Guide. This guide is available on the AskF5(sm)
       Knowledge Base ().

COPYRIGHT
       No part of this program may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or
       by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying,
       recording, or information storage and retrieval systems, for any
       purpose other than the purchaser's personal use, without the express
       written permission of F5 Networks, Inc.

       F5 Networks and BIG-IP (c) Copyright 2008-2010, 2012. All rights
       reserved.



BIG-IP                                                                     2014-02-18                                                                    tmsh(1)