3.4. Guided configuration topologyΒΆ

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SSLO creates discrete configurations based on the selected topology. For example, in previous versions of SSLO, a transparent and explicit forward proxy might be defined together. In SSLO 5.0 and above, these are configured separately. An explicit forward proxy topology will ultimately create an explicit proxy listener and its relying transparent proxy listener, but the transparent listener will be bound only to the explicit proxy tunnel. If a subsequent transparent forward proxy topology is configured, it will not overlap the existing explicit proxy objects. The Topology Properties page provides the following options:

For this lab:

Note

The only fields that need to be edited are the ones explicitly mentioned in these bullets. The other fields may be left with their default value.

  • Name: Enter some name (ex. "demoL3").

Tip

As a general rule, avoid using names with dashes (ex. sslo-demo-1) while creating objects in SSL Orchestrator. Underscores (ex. sslo_demo_1) and camel-casing (ex. ssloDemo1) are preferred.

  • Protocol: Select Any - this will create separate TCP, UDP and non-TCP/UDP interception rules.

  • IP Family: Select IPv4

  • Topology: Select L3 Outbound

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The Topology settings have been configured.

Click Save & Next to continue to the next stage.

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Note

There are no additional hands-on steps that need to be taken before proceeding to the next section. The information below is intended to provide additional context on the Topology.

The Protocol option presents four protocol types:

  • TCP - this option creates a single TCP wildcard interception rule for the L3 Inbound, L3 Outbound, and L3 Explicit Proxy topologies.
  • UDP - this option creates a single UDP wildcard interception rule for L3 Inbound and L3 Outbound topologies.
  • Other - this option creates a single any protocol wildcard interception rule for L3 Inbound and L3 Outbound topologies, typically used for non-TCP/UDP traffic flows.
  • Any - this option creates the TCP, UDP and non-TCP/UDP interception rules for outbound traffic flows.

The SSL Orchestrator Topologies option page presents six topologies:

  • L3 Explicit Proxy - this is the traditional explicit forward proxy.

  • L3 Outbound - this is the traditional transparent forward proxy. An L3 outbound topology is effectively a "routed hop" configuration, where the SSLO topology listener becomes a routed path on the way to external (ie. Internet) resources.

  • L3 Inbound - this is a reverse proxy configuration. Like the L3 outbound, L3 inbound is typically a routed hop configuration for traffic directed inbound. It can also behave as a traditional load-balanced application.

  • L2 Inbound - the layer 2 topology options insert SSLO as a bump-in-the-wire in an existing routed path, where SSLO presents no IP addresses on its outer edges. The L2 Inbound topology provides a transparent path for inbound traffic flows.

  • L2 Outbound - the layer 2 topology options insert SSLO as a bump-in-the-wire in an existing routed path, where SSLO presents no IP addresses on its outer edges. The L2 Outbound topology provides a transparent path for outbound traffic flows.

    Note

    It is important to distinguish SSLO's layer 2 topology from those of other traditional layer 2 SSL visibility vendors. Layer 2 solutions such as the Symantec SSL visibility appliance (SSLVA) limit the types of devices that can be inserted into the inspection zone to layer 2 and below, and devices must be directly connected to the appliance. An SSLO layer 2 topology only exists at the outer edges. Inside the inspection zone, full-proxy routing is still happening, so layer 3 and HTTP services can still function normally.

  • Existing Application - this topology is designed to work with existing LTM applications. Whereas the L3 Inbound topology provides an inbound gateway function for SSLO, Existing Application works with LTM virtual servers that already perform their own SSL handling and client-server traffic management. The Existing Application workflow proceeds directly to service creation and security policy definition, then exits with an SSLO-type access policy and per-request policy that can easily be consumed by an LTM virtual server.